The Dating Game: Hard for Most, Impossible for Evolutionists

PhotonQ-Homer' s Evolution Theory

What belief in evolution does to people. (Photo credit: PhOtOnQuAnTiQuE)

One of the many stark differences between creationists and evolutionists is in the assigning of ages to various things—most notably, that creationists believe the earth to be about 6,000 years old, whereas evolutionists believe the earth to be about 4.5 billion years old.

A Yahoo! article posted today illuminates this disparity in another way: Some scientists say they’ve resurrected a flower that was frozen in the Siberian permafrost 30,000 years ago, and other scientists say they’ve uncovered a 300-million-year-old forest. The creationist’s short response to these “finds” would be thus: No. Those dates are impossible. The creationist’s long(er) response would be something like: No way. Those dates are (to borrow a word from Rob Lowe’s Parks and Rec character) litrally impossible.

To be serious, though, and respectful of those on the other side of the argument, the crux of this debate goes to a couple of things: 1.) that the dating methods used by evolutionists are unreliable; and 2.) that their old-age beliefs are predicated above all else on a deliberately anti-theistic worldview, and everything else is “constructed,” in “just-so” fashion, around that basic premise.

As to the first problem, evolutionists “date” the age of the earth by “dating” various rock formations, and they do this using measurements of radio isotopes in the rocks. According to old-age scientist David Cohen: “We go and collect a sample and we measure the amount of parent and daughter (isotope) material” and “with a series of fairly simple calculations determine the age date of the rock.”

As this article on Creation.com points out, however, this dating method is based on numerous false assumptions. Evolutionists assume, for example, that the radioactive decay rate in rocks has always been the same—but there’s no proof of that. They also presume to know what the isotopic composition of any rock was in the past—but again, there’s no empirical reason for believing this.

There is, however, a nonempirical reason for believing this, which leads to my second point: that beliefs such as old-earthism are predicated on an absolute, ironclad refusal to allow any room for God in the picture; many of these folks not only don’t believe in God, they despise the very idea of Him and thus want no trace of Him around. So they set about constructing various “narratives” about the origin and history of the universe, the earth, and all of life, narratives that satisfy their strongest urge—which is not the pursuit of scientific truth but the eradication of God. This is why we have the fable of evolution (evolutionists’ attempt at explaining the existence of life without involving God) and the myth of an old universe (just give it enough time, and something’s bound to happen!). Evolutionists put the universe at roughly 14 billion years old, believing that this is enough time for molecules to have evolved all the way to man. Some scientists, however, have calculated the amount of time it would take for all the necessary mutations to transpire that would lead from molecules to man—and discovered that even 14 billion years isn’t enough time for such a feat (see this article). Besides that, it’s illogical to simply presume that X amount of time would be enough for Y event to occur, when you don’t know how long Y takes; simply throwing out a huge number doesn’t suddenly make it possible.

But that isn’t really the point for evolutionists, is it? For them, it’s not about time, or distance, or mutation rates or anything else empirical; it’s about God, and their hatred of Him.

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